Every Medaling Women's Ice Hockey Team At The Olympics Has Out LGBTQ Representation

This year, women's ice hockey is leading the Olympics in out LGBTQ visiblity, especially the Canadian women’s ice hockey team. Team Canada took home the gold medal in a thrilling 3-2 finals match last night against the US team and has recently received coverage for the historic number of out LGBTQ players representing Canada. This team features at least seven out LGBTQ players, the most out of all the countries competing at the Winter Games: forwards Brianne JennerEmily ClarkJill SaulnierJamie Lee Rattray, centre Mélodie Daoust, and defenders Erin Ambrose and Micah Zandee-Hart

Canada’s gold medal-winning team reflects a larger image of increased LGBTQ representation in women’s ice hockey during this year’s Olympics. There are at least 12 out ice hockey players coming from five of the ten ice hockey teams that competed in Beijing: Canada, the US, Finland, Sweden, and the Czech Republic.

"Olympic women's hockey demonstrates that LGBTQ inclusion is a winning strategy," said Ross Murray, the Vice President of the GLAAD Media Institute. "These out players represent their countries well and serve as role models for the rest of the LGBTQ community."

The other out athletes include: 

US forward and silver medalist Alex Carpenter

Finnish defender and bronze medalist Ronja Savolainen

Czech left-winger Aneta Lédlová

Swedish defender Ebba Berglund

Swedish defender Anna Kjellbin

Read about the history of LGBTQ athletes at the Olympics in GLAAD’s Guide to Covering LGBTQ Athletes at the Beijing Winter Olympics and Paralympics. At least 36 out athletes are competing in Beijing this year.

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