Where We Are on TV Report: 2012 - 2013 Season

The creation of the Where We Are on TV report in 2005 allows GLAAD to track trends and compile statistics for series regular characters on broadcast television with regard to sexual orientation, gender identity and race/ethnicity for the upcoming season.  GLAAD measures the presence of LGBT characters and the visibility of the community they portray on television in upcoming scripted primetime programs; both new and returning shows.  This marks the 17th year GLAAD has tracked the number of LGBT characters expected to appear in the new fall television season on both broadcast and cable networks.

At the launch of the 2012-2013 television season, GLAAD estimates that lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) scripted characters represent 4.4% of all scripted series regular characters on the five broadcast networks: ABC, CBS, The CW, Fox, and NBC. This is an increase from last year, with 31 series regular characters identified as LGBT.  Additionally GLAAD counted 19 recurring characters on primetime broadcast scripted series.

The number of scripted LGBT series regulars found on mainstream cable is up to 35 in the upcoming season.  GLAAD counted 26 additional recurring characters on cable.

On a mobile device? View the full report here

Download Where We Are on TV Report: 2012 - 2013 Season

This research serves as a benchmark for GLAAD's advocacy efforts which call for fair, accurate and diverse LGBT representations across media platforms. The characters in the Where We Are On TV report will later be reviewed for GLAAD's Network Responsibility Index (NRI), released annually each summer, which grades networks on overall LGBT impressions.

Click through to see this season’s scripted primetime regular and recurring LGBT characters.

On a mobile device? See the slideshow here

 

Read the press release

Visit What to Watch on TV, GLAAD's Daily Guide to What's LGBT on Television.

Where We Are On TV Archive

Where We Are on TV Report: 2005 - 2006 Season
Where We Are on TV Report: 2006 - 2007 Season
Where We Are on TV Report: 2007 - 2008 Season
Where We Are on TV Report: 2009 - 2010 Season
Where We Are on TV Report: 2010 - 2011 Season
Where We Are on TV Report: 2011 - 2012 Season

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