Navigation

This is a debugging block

Support Navigation

This is a debugging block

Sub-Navigation

This is a debugging block

GLAAD Social Media

This is a debugging block

connect with glaad

Transgender Day of Remembrance Resource Kit for Individuals

Content

This is a debugging block

On November 12 - 20, individuals and organizations around the county will participate in Transgender Awareness Week to help raise the visibility of transgender and gender non-conforming people, and address the issues these communities face. The final day of Transgender Awareness Week is the Transgender Day of Remembrance (TDOR), an annual observance on November 20 that honors the memory of those whose lives were lost in acts of anti-transgender violence. You can read more about Transgender Awareness Week and the Transgender Day of remembrance below, and find out how you can participate.

What is Transgender Awareness Week?

Transgender Awareness Week is a time for transgender people and their allies, to take action and bring attention to this community by educating the public and advancing advocacy around the issues that transgender people face.

What is the Transgender Day of Remembrance?

The Transgender Day of Remembrance (TDOR) was started by transgender advocate Gwendolyn Ann Smith as a vigil to honor her friend Rita Hester, a transgender woman who was killed in 1998. The vigil commemorated all the transgender people lost to violence that year and began an important memorial that has become the annual Transgender Day of Remembrance.

How can I participate in Transgender Awareness Week and the Transgender Day of Remembrance?

Participate in the Transgender Day of Remembrance by attending or organizing a vigil on November 20 to honor all those whose lives were lost to anti-transgender violence that year.  Vigils are typically hosted by local transgender advocates or LGBT organizations, and held at community centers, parks, places of worship and other venues. The vigil often involves reading a list of the names of those who died that year.

Find out more at www.glaad.org/tdor or www.transgenderdor.org

more publications

#SpiritDay Anti-Bullying Resource Kit

No one should be bullied or called names simply for being who they are. Still, millions of LGBT young people are made to feel like they don't fit in every day; some even feel unsafe.

Show your support for LGBT teens by wearing purple for Spirit Day on 10/19, and use the Amplify Your Voice resource kits below to help take a stand against bullying in your school.

No matter who you are, you have the power to make a difference.

GLAAD October 2012 Update

Why is GLAAD more relevant than ever?

And how can our work lead to full equality for LGBT people?

Download

Where We Are on TV Report: 2012 - 2013 Season

The creation of the Where We Are on TV report in 2005 allows GLAAD to track trends and compile statistics for series regular characters on broadcast television with regard to sexual orientation, gender identity and race/ethnicity for the upcoming season.  GLAAD measures the presence of LGBT characters and the visibility of the community they portray on television in upcoming scripted primetime programs; both new and returning shows.  This marks the 17th year GLAAD has tracked the number of LGBT characters expected to appear in the new fall television season on both broadcast and ca

GLAAD Network Responsibility Index 2011 - 2012

The sixth annual GLAAD Network Responsibility Index (NRI) is an evaluation of the quantity and quality of images of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people during the 2011-2012 television season. GLAAD researched primetime programming on ABC, CBS, The CW, Fox, NBC and 10 cable networks from June 1, 2011 to May 31, 2012. The report is intended to serve as a road map toward increasing fair, accurate, and inclusive LGBT media representations.

Download the full report

Pages