Transgender Day of Remembrance Resource Kit for Individuals

On November 12 - 20, individuals and organizations around the county will participate in Transgender Awareness Week to help raise the visibility of transgender and gender non-conforming people, and address the issues these communities face. The final day of Transgender Awareness Week is the Transgender Day of Remembrance (TDOR), an annual observance on November 20 that honors the memory of those whose lives were lost in acts of anti-transgender violence. You can read more about Transgender Awareness Week and the Transgender Day of remembrance below, and find out how you can participate.

What is Transgender Awareness Week?

Transgender Awareness Week is a time for transgender people and their allies, to take action and bring attention to this community by educating the public and advancing advocacy around the issues that transgender people face.

What is the Transgender Day of Remembrance?

The Transgender Day of Remembrance (TDOR) was started by transgender advocate Gwendolyn Ann Smith as a vigil to honor her friend Rita Hester, a transgender woman who was killed in 1998. The vigil commemorated all the transgender people lost to violence that year and began an important memorial that has become the annual Transgender Day of Remembrance.

How can I participate in Transgender Awareness Week and the Transgender Day of Remembrance?

Participate in the Transgender Day of Remembrance by attending or organizing a vigil on November 20 to honor all those whose lives were lost to anti-transgender violence that year.  Vigils are typically hosted by local transgender advocates or LGBT organizations, and held at community centers, parks, places of worship and other venues. The vigil often involves reading a list of the names of those who died that year.

Find out more at www.glaad.org/tdor or www.transgenderdor.org

more publications

The Amplifier - February 2010 - Media Circle

A Note from GLAAD President Jarrett T. Barrios

On a recent flight from New York to GLAAD’s office in Los Angeles, I had a poignant experience with the woman sitting next to me. After the initial pleasantries we began the standard small talk about family, why we were traveling to LA and what we did for work. I reflected a bit, and thought about how best to describe what it is we “do” at GLAAD.

The Amplifier - February 2010 - Alliance Circle

A Note from GLAAD President Jarrett T. Barrios

On a recent flight from New York to GLAAD’s office in Los Angeles, I had a poignant experience with the woman sitting next to me. After the initial pleasantries we began the standard small talk about family, why we were traveling to LA and what we did for work. I reflected a bit, and thought about how best to describe what it is we “do” at GLAAD.

Talking About LGBT Equality with African Americans

The Talking About series was co-authored by the Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation (GLAAD) and the Movement Advancement Project (MAP), in partnership with a board of contributing editors from the Human Rights Campaign, Lake Research Partners, PFLAG's Straight for Equality project, Arizona Together, researcher Margaret Conway, and Servicemembers Legal Defense Network (SLDN, on the Don't Ask, Don't Tell section).

Strategic Plan 2009-2013

The National Board of Directors unanimously approved GLAAD’s 2009 – 2013 Strategic Plan in October. It will serve as the lead planning document by which all GLAAD activity will be measured and reviewed over the next five years. The plan looks to optimize growth and assure we meet the full potential of our media advocacy and anti-defamation mission as our cultural change influence expands. With this vision and guidance of the National Board of Directors, and the careful implementation with GLAAD’s senior staff, we will reach new heights as we work towards LGBT equality.

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