Navigation

This is a debugging block

Support Navigation

This is a debugging block

Sub-Navigation

This is a debugging block

GLAAD Social Media

This is a debugging block

connect with glaad

Transgender Day of Remembrance Resource Kit for Individuals

Content

This is a debugging block

On November 12 - 20, individuals and organizations around the county will participate in Transgender Awareness Week to help raise the visibility of transgender and gender non-conforming people, and address the issues these communities face. The final day of Transgender Awareness Week is the Transgender Day of Remembrance (TDOR), an annual observance on November 20 that honors the memory of those whose lives were lost in acts of anti-transgender violence. You can read more about Transgender Awareness Week and the Transgender Day of remembrance below, and find out how you can participate.

What is Transgender Awareness Week?

Transgender Awareness Week is a time for transgender people and their allies, to take action and bring attention to this community by educating the public and advancing advocacy around the issues that transgender people face.

What is the Transgender Day of Remembrance?

The Transgender Day of Remembrance (TDOR) was started by transgender advocate Gwendolyn Ann Smith as a vigil to honor her friend Rita Hester, a transgender woman who was killed in 1998. The vigil commemorated all the transgender people lost to violence that year and began an important memorial that has become the annual Transgender Day of Remembrance.

How can I participate in Transgender Awareness Week and the Transgender Day of Remembrance?

Participate in the Transgender Day of Remembrance by attending or organizing a vigil on November 20 to honor all those whose lives were lost to anti-transgender violence that year.  Vigils are typically hosted by local transgender advocates or LGBT organizations, and held at community centers, parks, places of worship and other venues. The vigil often involves reading a list of the names of those who died that year.

Find out more at www.glaad.org/tdor or www.transgenderdor.org

more publications

The Kids Are All Right Resource Guide

The film is a moving account of a family with two moms, a son and a daughter. When the children make contact with their donor, the dynamics of the family are challenged.

The Amplifier - June 2010 - Media Circle

The Amplifier

a newsletter for our media circle members

The Amplifier - June 2010 - Alliance Circle

The Amplifier

a newsletter for our alliance circle members

Pride Guide

Celebrate Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Pride with GLAAD as we attend marches and festivals across the country! Join us on a march, attend your local Pride and learn more about the importance and history of the celebration.

GLAAD to be at Pride!

GLAAD staff, Leadership Councils and volunteers to marched with GLAAD at Prides throughout the U.S.! Click the images to view the facebook albums

GLAAD Media Reference Guide - 8th Edition

Over the past two decades, Americans have experienced a significant evolution in their understanding and cultural acceptance of gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender lives.

Consequently, media coverage of gay and lesbian issues (and increasingly, bisexual and transgender issues) has moved beyond simplistic political dichotomies and toward more fully realized representations not only of the diversity of our community, but also of our lives, our families, and our fundamental inclusion in the fabric of American society.

Pages