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Transgender Day of Remembrance Resource Kit for Individuals

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On November 12 - 20, individuals and organizations around the county will participate in Transgender Awareness Week to help raise the visibility of transgender and gender non-conforming people, and address the issues these communities face. The final day of Transgender Awareness Week is the Transgender Day of Remembrance (TDOR), an annual observance on November 20 that honors the memory of those whose lives were lost in acts of anti-transgender violence. You can read more about Transgender Awareness Week and the Transgender Day of remembrance below, and find out how you can participate.

What is Transgender Awareness Week?

Transgender Awareness Week is a time for transgender people and their allies, to take action and bring attention to this community by educating the public and advancing advocacy around the issues that transgender people face.

What is the Transgender Day of Remembrance?

The Transgender Day of Remembrance (TDOR) was started by transgender advocate Gwendolyn Ann Smith as a vigil to honor her friend Rita Hester, a transgender woman who was killed in 1998. The vigil commemorated all the transgender people lost to violence that year and began an important memorial that has become the annual Transgender Day of Remembrance.

How can I participate in Transgender Awareness Week and the Transgender Day of Remembrance?

Participate in the Transgender Day of Remembrance by attending or organizing a vigil on November 20 to honor all those whose lives were lost to anti-transgender violence that year.  Vigils are typically hosted by local transgender advocates or LGBT organizations, and held at community centers, parks, places of worship and other venues. The vigil often involves reading a list of the names of those who died that year.

Find out more at www.glaad.org/tdor or www.transgenderdor.org

more publications

Consistent Respect: Reporting On Transgender Crime Suspects

Transgender people are sometimes suspected and/or convicted of crimes. The media has a responsibility to represent all transgender people accurately, with their correct names and pronouns, and without relying on dehumanizing stereotypes. This responsibility does not change with the circumstances of a story, including instances where transgender people are suspected of crimes.

Hechos y Cifras: DOMA y la Proposición 8

Mientras que la Corte Suprema de EE.UU. se prepara para intervenir en los casos que cuestionan la llamada Acta del "Defensa del Matrimonio" y la anti-gay Proposición 8, GLAAD está colaborando con varias organizaciones para asegurar que en los medios de comunicación se aborden con precisión estos procesos históricos así como sus significado para parejas del mismo sexo. A continuación está una guía de recursos para ayudar a los profesionales de los medios a cubrir DOMA y la Proposición 8 durante y previo a las audiencias ante la Corte Suprema el 26 de marzo y 27.

Facts & Figures: DOMA/Proposition 8

Below is a resource guide to assist media professionals covering DOMA and Proposition 8.

Prom Resource Kit

For many lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender students, the excitement of prom season may be overwhelmed by concerns that they may not feel welcome, or worse, might be actively excluded from prom. This toolkit will help journalists craft prom coverage that integrates the experiences of LGBT youth into stories.

Black History Month Resource Kit

Resources and suggestions for developing LGBT-inclusive Black History Month features.

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