Not Just an 'Issue' -- Invisibility in the Immigration Debate Hurts Real People

Huffington Post Gay Voices
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May 7, 2013

 

On May 1, I participated in a huge LGBTQ contingent in a march for immigration reform and workers' rights in honor of International Workers' Day, more commonly known as May Day. People around the world marched for workers to be treated with respect and dignity, and in many cities throughout the U.S. people also marched for a fair and humane immigration reform.

I'm a very introspective person, so naturally the march got me thinking about a lot of things. But above all, it made me think about the world I want to live in, and how much change is needed to make that a reality.

At GLAAD we join other LGBT, labor, civil rights and immigrant groups and advocates in calling for a fair and humane immigration reform. But while the proposed bills have no doubt included some good things, there are too many aspects that are rather unjust and frankly draconian. Among these are harsh immigration enforcement policies, as well as unrealistic barriers to citizenship that would leave behind many immigrants, including day laborers, domestic workers, caretakers, and many LGBT people who are out of work due to discrimination or who are made more vulnerable as a consequence of their identities.

At the May Day march I thought about how many people are completely unaware about what's going on, despite the important grassroots public education efforts on immigration that advocates have been doing for years. And I thought "What else do we need? How can we change that?"

A piece by GLAAD's Spanish-Language Media Strategist. For more information on GLAAD's work on immigration reform, check out this blog post