Navigation

This is a debugging block

Support Navigation

This is a debugging block

Sub-Navigation

This is a debugging block

GLAAD Social Media

This is a debugging block

connect with glaad

Family

Content

This is a debugging block

Stories and information about families, relationships, and children; includes education, parenting, adoption, and other issues

Ya es Hora

I've known that I was gay since the first grade. But while Latinos are widely known for having close-knit, large extended families, certain issues we just don't talk about. And this was one of them. This week the Supreme Court is hearing two landmark cases on gay rights. It's a perfect time to start the conversation with our families, and I call on all my hermanos y hermanas to lend your voices to a topic that silently resonates with every Latino family in America.

Huff Post Latino Voices
|
April 1, 2013

Yes, You Can Be Religious AND Support Marriage Equality

We must admit that our community has traveled a long journey when it comes to accepting gays and lesbians. It wasn’t that long ago that the Republican party actively had a strategy of trying to suppress the Black vote or get Blacks to vote against Democrats by placing gay marriage initiatives on ballots across the state. On Sundays in many of our churches, our ministers would stand up and speak about the evils of homosexuality from the pulpit, as if oblivious to who was sitting in the pews and the church choir.

Essence
|
March 29, 2013

The Catholic activists behind the Supreme Court DOMA fight

Millions who watched the news Wednesday undoubtedly saw photos of Edie Windsor walking into the Supreme Court with her lawyer, Roberta Kaplan, prepared to challenge the injustices that the Defense of Marriage Act have levied against gay and lesbian couples since it was signed into law by President Bill Clinton in 1996. What most people will not know, however, is the instrumental role that few members of the New York City chapter of DignityUSA played in this historic moment.

National Catholic Reporter
|
March 29, 2013
Issues: 

Why Don't People Discuss Asylum Reform For LGBT Immigrants?

Thousands of gay émigrés come to this country because they are either fleeing persecution or the threat it poses. For them the path to citizenship is often through sexuality-based asylum claims. Being gay is an act punishable by death or life imprisonment in many countries around the world. Every year gay refugees flee their home countries seeking asylum from the threat of violence. Currently only twelve countries in the world grant asylum based on sexuality and we are one of them.

PolicyMic
|
March 29, 2013

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Family