Youth To Protest Chick-fil-a's Anti-LGBT Politics

YETA (Youth Empowered to Act), a group of LGBT youth leaders between the ages of 14 and 24, will protest the opening of a new Chick-fil-a franchise in Laguna Hills, California on Thursday, July 26.  The youth will be holding signs and handing out informational flyers during the grand opening starting at 6 A.M in order to notify potential customers of the company’s anti-equality politics.  Many people are expected to be lined up for sandwich giveaways, but the youth plan to steer customers to nearby, competing restaurants that have a better track record on LGBT equality. 

The fast food chain made headlines last week when its chief operating officer Dan Cathy admitted to the Baptist Press that the company stands opposed to marriage equality.  When asked if Chick-fil-A was against marriage for same-sex couples, Cathy responded “guilty as charged.”  Prior to Cathy’s admittance, the chain reportedly  donated $2 million  to anti-gay groups working to put a roadblock on marriage equality across the nation. 

YETA (some of whose members are pictured here at the GLAAD Media Awards) is part of the Gay and Lesbian Community Services Center of Orange County that focuses on social change through leadership development, community organizing, advocacy, and activism.  Earlier this month, the group spoke out against anti-LGBT bullying after the passage of Seth’s Law in California after one of their classmates at Fullerton High School was disqualified from the Mr. Fullerton pageant for speaking about being gay during the pageant.

These young adults are using their voices to create change in their community. GLAAD will be working with them to drive media attention for their work.  For more information, check out the group’s Facebook page.

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GLAAD Southern Stories will elevate the experiences of LGBT people in six of the nation's southern states. The initiative amplifies stories of LGBT people thriving in the South, ongoing discrimination, as well as the everyday indignities endured by LGBT people who simply wish to live the lives they love, including stories of family, stories of faith, stories of sports, and stories of patriotism