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A Year Later, #girlslikeus Have Much More To Say

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#girlslikeus, the hashtag created by trans activist and writer Janet Mock, has reached its one-year anniversary!

In an interview about #girlslikeus with Loop21.com, Janet explains, "I see it more as a collective than a hashtag. It started from just having conversations with other young trans women about our experiences and about how we label and identify ourselves. Most of them will say, 'I just identify myself as a girl.' We may be girls with something extra or girls who have to go through a different path in life, but at the end of the day, we just consider ourselves girls."

#girlslikeus has brought countless trans women into conversation with one another across social media, and has empowered them to tell their own stories apart from the media's stereotyped portrayals. As Janet has pointed out, the voices and concerns of trans women, especially trans women of color, are rarely heard beyond their own communities, and survival in a world with limited resources for trans people often depends upon shared experience. 

"#girlslikeus has given many trans women a space to easily and collectively broadcast our lives in a very visible way, a way that has helped discredit the mass media’s lazy, dehumanizing and violent depictions of us," says Janet. "In solidarity with other 'for us, by us' media platforms like OP magazine, We Happy Trans, Transgriot and various other personal/political trans blogs and vlogs, #girlslikeus is creating our own media, contributing a true reflection of who we are by telling our own stories, on our own terms."

You can read Janet's full interview about #girlslikeus at Loop21.com, and follow #girlslikeus on Twitter.

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