A walk to remember: Friend Movement's cross-country anti-bullying project

With Spirit Day on October 17 fast approaching, people across the country are engineering creative new ways to prevent and eliminate bullying.  One organization, Friend Movement, aims to shift anti-bullying conversations to more positive terms: working to stop bullying by being a better friend.  In partnership with GLAAD, GLSEN, and The Tyler Clementi Foundation, Friend Movement's founders are distributing 921 ribbons along 921-mile walk to celebrate the 921 lives that were cut short by bullying.  The interactive campaign, inspired largely by Tyler Clementi, invites friends from all over to contribute to spreading this message of friendship, and to cross the George Washington Bridge together on November 10th.

Elliot London and Ronnie Kroell will spend the month of October (and early November) journeying from Chicago to New York-- sharing stories with schools and community centers about bullying and friendship, keeping you updated on their walk, and placing 921 purple ribbons in places all along the journey.  The campaign encourages people to dedicate a ribbon, which will be displayed at the journey's commencement in New York City on November 10th.

You can contribute to Friend Movement's project through their indiegogo, where every $20 lets you dedicate a ribbon to be displayed in NYC, and also gets you a sleek, purple Friend Movement watch.  Funds raised will go toward not only travel and insurance expenses, but also toward putting together a Kick-Off event in Chicago, a Candlelight Vigil in NYC, and online videos about all the places in between.  You can also support the campaign by simply spreading the word.  To donate or just get more info, check out their indiegogo page here.  And for more info about Friend Movement, go to friendmovement.com

 

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As a Major League Baseball umpire for the past 29 seasons, Dale Scott has worked three World Series, three All-Star Games, two no-hitters and numerous playoff games. He is also the first out active male official in the MLB, NBA, NHL, or NFL, and the first Major League Baseball umpire to publicly say he is gay while active.