Vigil held tonight for Islan Nettles, a trans woman murdered in New York City


UPDATE: The vigil will be held at Jackie Robinson Park on West 148th Street at Bradhurst Ave, not West 48th Street. We apologize for the error.

A vigil will be held tonight in Manhattan's Harlem neighborhood to honor the life and memory of Islan Nettles, a 21-year-old transgender woman of color who was brutally attacked and killed last week.  According to DNAinfo.com, Nettles was walking with friends on 148th street and 8th avenue when a group of men approached and began attacking them, using anti-gay and anti-transgender slurs. Nettles was taken to Harlem Hospital, where she could not be revived and was on life support until August 22.

Nettles' family will be joined by Harlem Pride, the New York City Anti-Violence Project, the Manhattan Borough President's Office, and many LGBT and allied organizations to come together as a community and celebrate Islan's life. Information about the time and location of the vigil is below:
Tuesday, August 27, 2013 – 6:00 pm
Jackie Robinson Park
(entrance on West 148th Street at Bradhurst Avenue)
Harlem, NY

According to the Anti-Violence Project's recent report, 53.8% of all anti-LGBTQ homicide victims in 2012 were transgender women, and 73.1% of all anti-LGBTQ homicide victims were people of color. A recent study by the Organization of American States also found that across the Americas in the month of July, 2013, transgender people were murdered at a rate almost 50% higher than that of lesbian and gay people. 

If you are in New York City, please join the family of Islan Nettles and many advocates and allies to celebrate her life at tonight's vigil. GLAAD urges the media to elevate the voices of transgender people and report fairly and accurately on anti-transgender violence. 

 

Related Stories

 

GLAAD Southern Stories will elevate the experiences of LGBT people in six of the nation's southern states. The initiative amplifies stories of LGBT people thriving in the South, ongoing discrimination, as well as the everyday indignities endured by LGBT people who simply wish to live the lives they love, including stories of family, stories of faith, stories of sports, and stories of patriotism