VIDEOS: Asian American parents share love and pride for their LGBT children

Last week a series of public service announcements (PSAs) began airing on local California television channels that serve large Asian American communities in order to share Asian American parents' messages of unconditional love and acceptance for their LGBT children. The PSAs are the result of a partnership between the Asian Pride Project and the National Queer Asian and Pacific Islander Alliance, both organizations that strive to better the lives of Asian and Pacific Islander individuals who identify as LGBT and their families.

According to the Williams Institute at UCLA School of Law, there are around 324,600 LGBT Asian and Pacific Islander adults in the United States. Asian Pride Project director Aries Liao told NBC News, "We strongly believe that both the LGBTQ individuals and their family members share experiences or fears of being discriminated against, ostracized, shunned or isolated by their social communities." This stems from them coming from culturally conservative communities, where family roles and values are very traditional and it is hard for LGBT youth to come out.

In the new PSAs, parents of LGBT youth speak about the pride they have for their sons and daughters, and the importance of love and support. The ads were filmed in English, Korean, Japanese, Mandarin, Hindi, Tagalog, and Laotian. Although the parents come from diverse cultural backgrounds and speak different languages, they all relate to each other in their experiences as Asian Americans coming to terms with the ideas of acceptance and pride for their LGBT children.

Watch a few of the videos here!

PSA Korean from Asian Pride Project on Vimeo.

PSA Hindi from Asian Pride Project on Vimeo.

PSA Japanese from Asian Pride Project on Vimeo.

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As a Major League Baseball umpire for the past 29 seasons, Dale Scott has worked three World Series, three All-Star Games, two no-hitters and numerous playoff games. He is also the first out active male official in the MLB, NBA, NHL, or NFL, and the first Major League Baseball umpire to publicly say he is gay while active.