Pope Francis brushes aside anti-gay past, claims no judgment against gay people

During a Monday press conference, Pope Francis responded to questions about a reported "gay lobby" within the Vatican.

"If someone is gay, who searches for the Lord and has goodwill, who am I to judge," the Pope remarked in part.

"The Catechism of the Catholic Church explains this very well," the Pope continued. "It says they should not be marginalized because of this (orientation) but that they must be integrated into society."

The remarks stand in stark contrast to the Pope's long history of anti-gay comments. For instance:

"Let's not forget, Pope Francis had no problem passing judgment when he spoke out against marriage equality in Argentina, or when he claimed that adoption by same-sex parents is 'discrimination' against children," said GLAAD's Ross Murray. "The Pope's selective judgment is a clear indication that tides are changing, and the hierarchy is increasingly aware that its anti-gay views are out of step with Catholics across the globe. Already in the United States, a majority of Catholics have spoken out in support of their gay and lesbian brothers and sisters — a trend that will no doubt continue across nations."

According to the Pew Research Center, 7 in 10 American Catholics think gay people should be accepted by society. 

 

 

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As a Major League Baseball umpire for the past 29 seasons, Dale Scott has worked three World Series, three All-Star Games, two no-hitters and numerous playoff games. He is also the first out active male official in the MLB, NBA, NHL, or NFL, and the first Major League Baseball umpire to publicly say he is gay while active.