PHOTOS: Boy Scouts rally in support of ousted gay Scoutmaster; Church remains at his side

Steph Brusig/The Seattle Lesbian

Seattle-area Cub Scouts, Boy Scouts, Scout leaders, and parents rallied at the Chief Seattle Council headquarters yesterday in support of Geoff McGrath, a Scoutmaster whose registration was revoked by the Boy Scouts of America (BSA) because he is gay. Ralliers called on the Council to reinstate McGrath.

According to the Seattle Times, the Church that charters McGrath's Boy Scouts Troop is sticking by his side and has indicated it will allow him to continue his Scoutmaster duties:

[Rainier Beach United Mehtodist Church Pastor Monica] Corsaro said the church stands behind McGrath “100 percent” and the parents of the boys have been supportive.

Despite official revocation of his position, McGrath said he plans to remain a Scout leader, and he has Corsaro’s support. “I haven’t abandoned my post,” he said.

"As a Reconciling Congregation, it's important to us that we are open to all people," said Reverend Dr. Monica Corsaro of the Rainier Beach United Methodist Church. "It's a part of our values that the spirit of inclusion is also reflected in the Boy Scout Troop we charter. The congregation stands with Geoff, because his work with this Troop reflects the spirit, values and religious teachings of Rainier Beach United Methodist Church."

This week, 17 year-old Pascal Tessier, who earlier this year became the first known openly gay Boy Scout to earn the esteemed rank of 'Eagle Scout,' launched a Change.org petition in support of McGrath, calling on Seattle-based company Amazon.com to pause its financial support of the BSA through the Amazon Smiles program. That petition has amassed over 30,000 signatures in 48 hours.

Check out additional photos from the Seattle rally below. All photos courtesy of Steph Brusig/The Seattle Lesbian.

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