Lady Gaga to Launch Anti-Bullying Foundation Next Year

Pop superstar Lady Gaga created her last album, Born This Way, to communicate a distinct message of acceptance and self-confidence with the LGBT community very much in mind; even going so far as to mention lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people by name in the lyrics of the album’s same-titled debut single.  Yet she has also been one of the fiercest public advocates for legislative action on behalf of the LGBT community on everything from Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell to marriage equality.  More recently, much of her advocacy’s focus has turned toward issues pertaining to bullying and protection of LGBT youth, including legal protections.  Today, Lady Gaga announced the creation of the Born This Way Foundation to take her anti-bullying work to the next level.

On Facebook, Lady Gaga posted, “I’m proud to announce: my mommy + I have created the Born This Way Foundation. A place for Bravery, Love, Acceptance.” Expected to officially launch next year, the Born This Way Foundation is a partnership with the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, The California Endowment, and the Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University.

With a tagline of “Empowering Youth, Inspiring Bravery,” the foundation invites you to join a “movement to build a brave new world where humanity is embraced, individuals are empowered, and intolerance is eliminated.”

In this new role, Lady Gaga leverages her star power to raise awareness and elevate the issues that LGBT youth face. As Dr. Bob Ross, the CEO and president of The California Endowment points out, "This brand of leadership is sorely needed in today's world."

GLAAD thanks Lady Gaga for all of the work she’s done on behalf of the LGBT community and for taking a stand to create a culture of protecting, nurturing, and empowering youth.

NOTE: Post was created with the help of Media Field Strategist Elana Stone.

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As a Major League Baseball umpire for the past 29 seasons, Dale Scott has worked three World Series, three All-Star Games, two no-hitters and numerous playoff games. He is also the first out active male official in the MLB, NBA, NHL, or NFL, and the first Major League Baseball umpire to publicly say he is gay while active.