James Wallington, from CW's "Capture," talks with GLAAD about breaking stereotypes and reality television

The CW's new extreme competition reality show Capture, inspired by The Hunger Games, features 12 teams of two dropped into a remote, mountainous area for one month, as they compete to be the last team standing and take home the $250,000 grand prize. This season features host and "Game Master" Luke Tipple and three out contestants, including James Wallington. James spoke with GLAAD about his experience on the show, challenging stereotypes, and what he hopes viewers will get from his story.

Capture airs Tuesdays at 9:00 p.m. on The CW. You can catch James as the co-host of the Capture AfterShow online at AfterBuzz TV.

GLAAD: What inspired you to sign up for Capture?

James Wallington: I was inspired to submit for Capture because I was at a point in my life where I wanted a break from the daily grind and was craving an adventure. My sister and I love adventure. As siblings, we don't have a lot of opportunities to go on adventures together, at least not since we were children exploring our backyard or going on family vacations. Since we now live across the country from each other, we figured this was the perfect chance to have another adventure together. I've also been a huge fan of reality competition shows since I was twelve and to share this dream with my sister made the experience that much more special.

GLAAD: As a gay man competing on a wilderness survival show, did you worry about being stereotyped? Were you concerned about how other players would react to you?

JW: I don't think "worried" would be the right word but I was well aware that stereotypes could come into play. I think stereotypes surfacing in this type of situation is only natural. I am who I am and I'm extremely proud of who I am and where I come from. At the end of the day, I'd like to think that I did break some stereotypes.

GLAAD: What was the most important skill to have in the series?

JW: I believe the answer to this question varies for each team/contestant. However, I think for Rebecca (my sister) and I, the most important skills we used in the competition were our wits, social skills and mental games. We knew a lot of physicality would come into play while competing but we were able to appear weaker while remaining under the radar with the skills we did use. We were very strategically minded, which ultimately was our downfall in the end. Played a little too smart and revealed our cards a little too soon.

GLAAD: Your sister Rebecca was your Capture teammate. How was it working on a team with her?

JW: Going into an extreme competition like Capture with a sibling could be dangerous territory but for Rebecca and I, it was the best thing we could've ever done together. We walked away from the show with a deeper understanding of each other and new found appreciation for one another. The memories we created will last us a lifetime and we'll be able to share them at holiday dinners in the future with our families, which is really awesome to think about. 

GLAAD: We recently saw your team's elimination. What would you like viewers to take away from your story?

JW: We not only represented ourselves in the game, but we like to think we represented all underdogs as well. So if viewers can take away anything from our story it'd be - don't underestimate the underdog. Just because we aren't marathon runners or play college level sports, doesn't mean that we couldn't pose as a threat. In the end, you've got to dig deep and give yourself credit, that you're stronger than you realize. We walked away proud of the game we played, with absolutely no regrets.

Capture airs Tuesdays at 9:00 p.m. on The CW. Watch James as the co-host of the Capture AfterShow online at AfterBuzz TV and find him on twitter @JamesWallington.

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As a Major League Baseball umpire for the past 29 seasons, Dale Scott has worked three World Series, three All-Star Games, two no-hitters and numerous playoff games. He is also the first out active male official in the MLB, NBA, NHL, or NFL, and the first Major League Baseball umpire to publicly say he is gay while active.