Hudson School GSA Supports LGBT Youth, Was Purple For #SpiritDay!

The Hudson School GSA in New Jersey joined the many students and millions of Americans who went purple for Spirit Day! Corey, the GSA’s president, shared why the independent school for grades 5-12, which also participated in GLSEN’s Ally Week and celebrated LGBT History Month, supports Spirit Day and how the GSA works daily to support LGBT youth and stand against bullying.

Corey writes, “Supporting the rights of all people, and fighting to end bullying and intolerance, are no-brainers for us, as is participating in Spirit Day. Although our [GSA] meetings are only open to students in grades 9-12, we realize that many students become aware of their sexual orientation and gender identity, and experience bullying, long before high school. As role models for the students in grades 5-8 at our school, we are in a unique position to reach out to them and further cultivate a safe, supportive, accepting community for them.”

“By leading anti-bullying workshops and lessons on LGBT issues in their classes, they gain much more than knowledge about the topics at hand. They also learn that we will not accept bullying and that we are committed to speaking out against it. Hearing this from high school students, whom they look up to and respect, impacts them significantly more than their teachers leading the same lessons. They are also eager to get involved in the GSA’s school-wide events and campaigns.”

“Spirit Day gives our community a chance to reaffirm our belief in our school’s motto of Courage, Compassion, and Commitment. Standing up to bullying, and supporting LGBT youth, are two causes we are deeply committed to, and we will never lose an ounce compassion for others no matter how much courage it takes.”

You can see more schools, colleges and GSAs that participated in Spirit Day here, and check out our full Spirit Day recap!

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As a Major League Baseball umpire for the past 29 seasons, Dale Scott has worked three World Series, three All-Star Games, two no-hitters and numerous playoff games. He is also the first out active male official in the MLB, NBA, NHL, or NFL, and the first Major League Baseball umpire to publicly say he is gay while active.