GQ Apologizes After Homophobic Tweet

One might think a men's fashion magazine would have higher standards than to reduce itself to tired 1960's stereotypes to insult gay people but unfortunately GQ proves that isn't always the case.

Yesterday, the magazine released its annual Year in Style report in which editors named the best and worst offenses in fashion over the previous year. Only instead of writing solely about fashion faux pas or commendations, GQ editors used the list as an opportunity to perpetuate the dangerous and false assumption that being gay is a result of a hormone imbalance.

In regard to openly gay singer, Adam Lambert, the magazine later tweeted "Rules of Street Style: If you have testosterone problems, a mustache doesn't always help" and linked to Lambert's profile on the magazine's website.


Clearly, the New York-based editors of GQ understand that being gay isn't the result of a hormone imbalance.   The remark was meant as an insult, and while insult comedy is the bread-and-butter of catty end-of-year worst dressed lists, the editors of GQ should know better than to disparage their own readership in an attempt at humor.

 

This kind of humor isn't just bad taste and bad business, it's dangerous.   While one can assume that the editors of GQ understand that to be gay isn't a deficiency of anything, unfortunately, many in America aren't in the same privileged position.  We live in a country where millions of dollars is spent annually by parents and others trying to change gay youth to straight.   This incredibly damaging practice is in part perpetuated by myths such as the one espoused in GQ's joke about Adam Lambert. Jokes like this have no place in respectable media. 

GLAAD and many others tweeted to the magazine's editors to demand an apology:

GLAAD also reached out to the magazine's editors directly to demand an apology. The GQ editors subsequently apologized to its readers via Twitter saying:

GQ has confirmed to GLAAD that they are taking internal steps to help ensure this does not happen in the future.

Issues: 

 

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