Go Purple for #SpiritDay October 20: Submit your videos!

Millions of Americans wear purple on Spirit Day as a sign of support for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) youth and to speak out against bullying. Spirit Day was started in 2010 by teenager Brittany McMillan as a response to the young people who had taken their own lives. Observed annually on October 20, individuals, schools, organizations, and corporations, media professionals and celebrities wear purple, which symbolizes spirit on the rainbow flag. Getting involved is easy -- participants are asked to simply "go purple" on October 20 as we work to create a world in which LGBT teens are celebrated and accepted for who they are.

This year, we are asking people to send an additional message of support by submitting videos to let the world know why they are going purple and why others should join in supporting LGBT youth and taking a stand against bullying.

Let's send a message to all the young people looking to find acceptance for themselves, their family and friends who are gay, lesbian, bisexual, or transgender. Share your story and tell the world why you are going purple. We will review your submission and post it to our YouTube channel.

Check out some of these videos by GLAAD staff:

About Spirit Day: Millions of Americans wear purple on Spirit Day as a sign of support for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) youth and to speak out against bullying. Spirit Day was started in 2010 by teenager Brittany McMillan as a response to the young people who had taken their own lives. Observed annually on October 20, individuals, schools, organizations, corporations, media professionals and celebrities wear purple, which symbolizes spirit on the rainbow flag. Getting involved is easy -- participants are asked to simply "go purple" on October 20 as we work to create a world in which LGBT teens are celebrated and accepted for who they are.

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