First transgender girl plays on California high school girls' softball team

Seventeen year old Pat Cordova-Goff  is a senior at Azusa High School in California. She is a member of the cheer squad and is Azusa High School's student body president with a 4.0 grade average. Pat is also the founder of Azusa's Gay Straight Alliance. She is now on her way to be the state's first transgender student to play high school softball on a girl's team.

The LA Times reports:

Pat, who played baseball in her freshman year, began trying out for the softball team two weeks ago, said Azusa Unified School District Supt. Linda Kaminski. The transgender teen learned she made the softball team when high school officials posted tryout results Thursday, Kaminski said. The first game is scheduled March 5 at the school.

“The softball team is practicing and focusing on their upcoming season,” Kaminski said. “Coaches from nearby districts are positive about the upcoming games.” Kaminski said only a few people have expressed concern about the school’s decision to let a transgender student play on the girls’ softball team. “But when they hear how we are addressing their concern, they are understanding,” Kaminski said.

Pat's path to making history in her district, perhaps the state, was paved by two major events.

One of them was California AB 1266. The state law--signed by Gov. Jerry Brown last August--prohibits public schools from “discriminating on the basis of specified characteristics, including gender, gender identity and expression,” the bill reads. The California Interscholastic Federation, which governs school sports, took action and amended its Constitution and Bylaws to include new guidelines for transgender students participating in high school sports..

Pat’s determination and courage are truly admirable. GLAAD wishes Pat and all her teammates on the Azusa HS girls’ softball team a winning season!

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