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Facebook removes game based on anti-LGBT violence in Republic of Georgia

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Two weeks ago, violent protestors connected with the Orthodox Christian Church attacked LGBT pride marchers in Tbilisi, Georgia. This week, someone created a game titled, "Call of Taburetka" in which players control a flying Christian Orthodox priest who throws stools at flying gay men, lesbians with rainbow flags, and even the evacuation buses used in Tbilisi. The game was featured on Facebook, but has since been taken down.

The game was based on the horrific real-life experiences of LGBT advocates in the Republic of Georgia. At least 17 people were injured in attacks on LGBT people, as they attempted to march through the streets of the capital. Signs of protestors read, "We don’t need Sodom and Gomorrah!" and "Democracy does not equal immorality!" Police in the Tbilisi escorted out the participants that had gathered in city center in evacuation vans. Although authorities in Georgia gave the go ahead for the Pride march, they expressed that all Georgian citizens are entitled to voice their views in public.

The game also comes when a wave of anti-LGBT violence is occurring in New York City. The Anti-Violence Project has reported that 2012 was the 4th most violent year for anti-LGBT violence on record.

GLAAD joined several LGBT advocacy groups to petition Facebook and the game has since been removed. In a statement, Facebook noted that they removed the game for violating content policies, "We take action against apps that violate our platform policies as laid out here: https://developers.facebook.com/policy/, in order to maintain a trustworthy experience for users."

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