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"Danger Lies in Isolation": Trans Men Fight Adult Depression with "Talk About It" Campaign

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In an effort to address depression, anxiety, and suicide within the adult queer community, the editors of Original Plumbing magazine have launched the Talk About It campaign.

Amos Mac and Rocco Kayiatos, whose magazine is about the culture of trans men, hope to bring attention to the prevalence of depression and isolation within the trans community, as well as to collectively find solutions, support, and cathartic release in order to, ultimately, save lives.

“Suicide in this community is not just a teenage issue. Adults still feel depressed and their depression becomes severe enough that they take their own lives. That’s something we don’t have a lot of space to talk about,” Rocco says in “TALK ABOUT IT Rocco and Amos,” the video that launched the campaign.

Since Talk About It launched on August 13, Original Plumbing continues to post videos submitted by people who are queer, talking about their struggles and how they cope. You can submit videos of your own stories—“strengths, weaknesses, failures, tools,” as Amos says--to talkaboutit@originalplumbing.com, as well as tweet with the hash tag #TalkAboutIt, and check Original Plumbing’s Talk About It page for more updates.

“I still feel scared to open up and share how I feel depressed or moments when I feel desperate. I don’t reach out,” says Rocco. “The danger lies in this isolation.”

Amos and Rocco, in their video, explain how feelings of isolation can exist even for a person who is surrounded by friends. Battles with depression and anxiety are often internalized and can subsequently worsen or go untreated. The Talk About It campaign seeks to open dialogue about these issues, reduce the stigmas surrounding depression, and build a stronger, supportive queer community.

“I hope that this serves as a wake-up call globally,” Rocco adds, “and we all feel like we can have a real community where we talk about things that are hard, where don’t just come together in moments of joy,  but we can share the struggle with each other and the pain, and that we can be there for each other.”

LGBT people in crisis should contact The Trevor Project 's 24/7 Lifeline at 866-4-U-TREVOR (866-488-7386), Trevor Chat, the Trevor Projects' online messaging service, or The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255).

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