Navigation

This is a debugging block

Support Navigation

This is a debugging block

Sub-Navigation

This is a debugging block

GLAAD Social Media

This is a debugging block

connect with glaad

Couples participate in Great Facebook Kiss-In supporting Michael Sam

Content

This is a debugging block

In light of Michael Sam's draft to the St. Louis Rams and the fact that Sam kissed his boyfriend in celebration of being drafted, Editor-at-large of HuffPost Gay Voices Michelangelo Signorile called on the efforts of Facebook to stage a "Kiss-In."

 

Signorile says:

So with that, I hereby launch the Great Facebook Kiss-In, urging everyone -- whether gay, straight or bi -- to change their profile pics to two women kissing or two men kissing. Maybe it's you and your husband or wife, or your partner or sweetheart, or you and a friend. Maybe it's your dad and your dad, or your mom and your mom. Maybe it's two other people you just like a lot or think are hot. Your favorite celebrities, whatever. I've provided a couple of links to sites where you can choose free-usage photos of two men or two women (but there are many other places you can go), and I've provided a few photos below (free usage from WikiCommons) for you to choose from if you like, which you can download.

He was inspired by an article Mark Joseph Stern wrote on Slate saying that LGBT people should be kissing more in public, so as to "desensitize the world."

According to Signorile people aren't used to seeing two men or two women kissing, or they are simply uneasy even if they do support LGBT people. He makes the point, however, that people were also uneasy when two straight people of different races kiss and that we have somewhat moved on from that.

He hopes that one day in the future we will look back at this, see how ridiculous people are being and laugh.

But this will only happen if we do this kind of thing (Kiss-Ins) a lot.

Related Stories

Highlight First

This is a debugging block

 

Featured Story

GLAAD has released its second annual 'Studio Responsibility Index,' a report that maps the quantity, quality and diversity of images of LGBT people in films released by the seven largest motion picture studios during the 2013 calendar year.