AP Poll Results Show Majority Support for Marriage Equality

Today, The Associated Press released results from a recent poll, showing that 53% of respondents believe the government should give legal recognition to marriages between couples of the same sex.  The poll, which surveyed 1,000 adults via telephone, was conducted by The Associated Press and the National Constitution Center. This is the sixth consecutive poll this year showing that a majority of people nationwide either support legal recognition for married lesbian and gay couples or oppose a federal ban on such recognition.

The poll results are indicative of a major shift in the attitudes of Americans toward marriage equality over the past few years. In 2009, a narrow majority opposed legal recognition of marriages between lesbian and gay couples, Now, just two years later, the majority supports these marriages. Last month, GLAAD released an Eye On The Media highlighting the growing support for marriage equality across all political groups, as argued by Democrat and Republican pollsters Jan van Lohuizen and Joel Benenson. In their memo, van Lohuizen and Benenson show an increase in support over the years in polls conducted by CNN, The Public Religion Research Institute, Quinnipiac, Gallup, ABC News, and The Washington Post. Similar trends were outlined in April by The New York Times.

Other findings of the poll by The Associated Press and the National Constitution Center show a generational gap in positions on marriage. The majority of respondents under 65 years of age were in support of legal recognition for lesbian and gay married couples. In addition, 57% of all respondents said they believed same-sex couples should receive all of the protections afforded to straight married couples.

GLAAD will continue to monitor polling results around marriage equality and the trend of growing support for legal recognition of lesbian and gay married couples.

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As a Major League Baseball umpire for the past 29 seasons, Dale Scott has worked three World Series, three All-Star Games, two no-hitters and numerous playoff games. He is also the first out active male official in the MLB, NBA, NHL, or NFL, and the first Major League Baseball umpire to publicly say he is gay while active.