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Ugandan Bishop Speaks Out Against 'Kill the Gays' Bill

By GLAAD |
June 14, 2010

Bishop Christopher Senyonjo, chaplain of Integrity Uganda, culminates his coast to coast USA speak out against the “anti-homosexuality” bill in Uganda in New York City.  The bill proposes the death sentence for gay people in Uganda—as well as imprisonment of anyone who does not report someone they suspect of being gay.

After a week of meetings with White House and congressional officials in Washington, DC, On Sunday, June 13, Bishop Senyonjo preached at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine, the largest cathedral in the United States.  On June 14, he keynoted a consultation of national leaders at the Church Center for the United Nations to work for the end of all laws against people based on sexual orientation or gender identity.  On June 15, the bishop is on a panel at Rehoboth Temple with African American faith leaders such as Rev. Irene Monroe and Pastor Joseph Tolton, recorded by GBGMNews.

Bishop Senyonjo, a married, grandfather of 11, and one of the few Ugandan Anglican bishops or priests who strongly condemns the bill, calls it a gross violation of human rights. For his stand, he was stripped of all church responsibilities and financial support by the Anglican Church of Uganda. They stopped short of defrocking him—he is still a bishop.

Instead of bowing to church intimidation, Bishop Senyonjo is speaking out even more strongly for the full humanity of gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender people as persecution in Uganda increases.

Integrity USA, a 35 year old advocacy group within the Episcopal Church is sponsoring Bishop Christopher’s visit. If the “anti-homosexuality” bill passes, Bishop Senyonjo could be arrested, and Integrity Uganda could be outlawed.

GLAAD is working with Integrity to provide media assistance during Bishop Christopher’s tour and will continue to amplify the voices of faith leaders who are working on eliminating all laws against people based on sexual orientation and gender identity.

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